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The Importance of Case Studies in Digital Marketing

A case study is usually a post-explanatory analysis of an event or a project. Digital Marketing industry relies heavily on case studies as their primary source of lead generation. In an industry whose benchmarks are difficult to determine, case studies play an important role in showcasing the success of a company.

Digital Marketing Case Studies
Digital Marketing Case Studies

Why are case studies so important?

A digital marketing company can leverage its best executed success stories by converting them into analytical case studies contemplating what was done, how it was done and what was the outcome. The following are the advantages of case studies in the context of digital marketing and social media:

Case Studies help establish credibility

The introspective nature of case studies allows customers to get a fair idea of how capable a company is in several counts: creativity, up-to-date knowledge, and innovation. Not only can a customer gain a fair knowledge of how the subject of case study could affect his own business, he can also understand how credible the company is in delivering its services.

Case studies go a long way in influencing the sentiment of the customers. Since most case studies include client testimonials that end up vetting the successful project, it becomes all the more powerful in making the company a strong contender as against its competitors. And there are too many of them one to be up against.

Showcasing success

Many companies are able to showcase the results of their digital marketing campaigns through case studies. Several such case studies are available online via websites like afaqs.com. For example, a recent article on our Official Blog showcased the outcome of Cadbury Bournville’s ‘Tape a Tweet’ Twitter campaign. This a brilliant example of the social media team and the videography team working in sync with each other, as well as the customer engagement activity. They produced instant videos based on the followers’ tweets to capture their attention and create a buzz in Twitterdom in a big way.

So also, was another campaign conducted by online shopping store HomeShop18 using a new jingle to create buzz around the concept of ‘happiness due to shopping’. They used the hash tag #MakesMeHappy to engage their customers to tweet about what makes them happy and mentioned HomeShop18’s Twitter handle as well as the hashtag in their tweet. While the Twitteratti got swept into this campaign, what came as a big surprise was the spontaneous conversion of selected tweets into caricature images. Followers were absolutely delighted to see themselves and their tweets converted into funny images and there was a lot of flurry across Twitter during this campaign.

Great as marketing collateral

When pitching to prospective clients, case studies hold the power to do the entire talking (or rather, most of it). It’s a known fact by now that consumer behaviour is influenced by the generic perception of the market. For example, if A wants to buy a helmet and sees a particular brand getting more reviews, A is likely to choose that brand, assuming that it is famous or popular and hence, good. The underlying principle here is that of subtle recommendation. A completed sale is a recommendation. The case study feeds into that perception. “If another company has seen success through this campaign, I would want to see similar success for my company as well.” – This is how the thought process of most prospective clients goes.

Conclusion:

Case studies are very important and if you are a digital marketing company or for that matter, any other company, you can make use of a good case study and leverage on its advantages in a big way. Just a disclaimer though, it is always advisable to include not only the good points but also the roadblocks encountered and how they were dealt with in the case study to make it complete.

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Use PPC Remarketing to increase your online sales

Google rolled out Remarketing in early 2010, as a feature that tries to reach users who have clicked on an ad or browsed a website but did not convert into customers. Remarketing can be considered as a second attempt (or third, and fourth) of advertisers to try and convince customers who abandoned a call to action after showing interest in their product/service.

Basically, here is a simplistic portrayal of remarketing:

Remarketing in PPC
Remarketing in PPC

I visit website A >> I fill up a form >> I change my mind and do not click submit. >> I close window of website A.

(Background – Website A tracks me and my search behaviour via cookies)

I continue with my browsing >> I am on website B >> I see ads of website A’s products on Website B. (>> I feel stalked!!) >> I open website C >> I see ads of website A’s products on Website C. ((>> I am definitely being stalked!! HELLLLP!!!)

Wondering how remarketing is done?

It’s really as simple as adding a small piece of code to all the webpages on your website. This piece of code is called the Remarketing Tag. Then, whenever a visitor lands on your website, you add their cookies to different remarketing lists based on their search behaviour and start showing them ads relevant to their searches.

What? Remarketing sounds like stalking!!

It is, and isn’t! There is a lot more you could do with your remarketing lists. You could write separate ad copies or create a separate AdWords campaign to be shown only to people on your remarketing list, say, for example, offering discounts on the products they were searching for earlier. There is a good chance that the users would land up on your website again and convert into customers!

Overdoing Remarketing – No stalking please!

Remarketing will actually feel like stalking if you bombard the user with your ads at every site that he/she visits. Would you want that to happen to you? No, of course no one would. So, it’s a sensible idea to make use of caps on frequency to contain the number of times your ads are shown to a user. We do not want him to get irritated and remember our brand in a bad way, right?

Remarketing for converted customers

It makes sense to keep the converted customers out of your remarketing campaigns, doesn’t it? Wrong. In fact, based on the type of industry your ecommerce site is in, you can play with “related products” advertising in a way that could help you in upselling with converted customers. For example, if I buy a sofa set for my living room, and I see ads of centre tables via remarketing, I might go back to the site to check out some more furniture.

A disclaimer here, though! Ensure that you are not persisting too much! Never annoy your customers. See the point above this one.

About bidding higher

Once you have identified which customers previously showed interest in your products or services, you can bid higher for those people’s subsequent searches and ensure that they see your ads.

Remarketing, Retargeting… isn’t it all the same?

Basically, retargeting is to target customers who previously visited your site, by displaying ads about the searched products on the other websites that they are browsing. So, one can safely categorise retargeting under the broader perspective of remarketing.

Remarketing also includes Email Remarketing, which is done to target users who have abandoned a form or not completed the purchase of their shopping cart items. Both the terms can be used interchangeably. However, remarketing can result in upselling, related product selling, etc.

So how does one do Remarketing?

There are some tools, other than the Google AdWords account that can be used for retargeting, such as Retargeter, AdRoll, Fetchback, Chango, etc. Companies like Springmetrics are also being used by e-commerce sites to execute retargeting strategies.

My Digital Marketing Team offers quality wholesale PPC services which include remarketing and retargeting, to agencies and resellers at highly competitive prices and affordable rates. To find out how our wholesale PPC services can help your clients’ business grow by multiple folds, contact us here.